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  1. History of the protests

    1. When did the protests begin? Why did they begin? Many factors have led to the protests including issues like human rights violations, government corruption, dictatorship, the absolute power of the government, unemployment, extreme poverty, and a large percentage of educated but dissatisfied youth within the population. The situation began on February 15, 2011 as a series of peaceful protest tests which were met by military force by the Gaddafi administration. They led to an uprising that spread across the country.

    2. How did the government respond? A day of rage was declared February 17 when Libyan military and security forces fired live ammunition on protesters. On February 18 security forces with Drew from being gone thing after being overwhelmed by protesters. The government responded to the demonstrations with force injuring and killing many people. The uprising spread across the country and the forces that opposed Gaddafi establishing a government based on thing dons the named the national transitional Council whose goal was to overthrow the Gaddafi led government and hold democratic elections.

    3. Identify at least two other major events and government responses. On February 17 a day of rage was declared by the national conference for the Libyan opposition it was the first time Libyan military and security forces fired live any nation on protesters. On February 18 security forces withdrew from being gone the after being overwhelmed by the protesters. Some security personnel and military members joined the protesters. The protests spread across the country and anti-Gaddafi forces established a provincial government East in been dons he they called their government the national transitional Council

    4. Identify two international responses that seem significant. September 15 the British Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Sarkozy arrived in Libya's capital with thousands of people waving British and French flags. Both leaders had advocated armed intervention after the Libyan people rose up in February against the dictator Muammar Qaddafi.The second international response that seem significant is when the US had found support from the African Union AU as a critical component but it became clear that the AU would not sign on to the kind of attack on Libya contemplated in a UN resolution for the no-fly zone. Shortly after the bombing began the five-member AU committee on the Libyan crisis called for an immediate stop to all attack and restraint. So the AU turned out to be no help at all and did not support the United States

    5. Have international organizations (for example the Arab League, the United Nations, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, etc.) or other countries been involved in events in your country? How? On February 26 the UN Security Council imposed sanctions on Gaddafi and his family at the beginning of the crisis and authorized a no-fly zone over Libya with all necessary measures to protect civilians against Gaddafi's army this means that they were allowed to use military actions to stop him.As mentioned in answer d above the AU said it supported the United States and the UN and a no-fly zone then they turned back on their word and condemned the UN and the United States after they started enforcing the no-fly zone.


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  3. Today

    1. Who is in charge of the government? Elections to a general national Congress were held on July 7, 2012 and the NTC handed power to the newly elected assembly on August 8, 2012. The Congress had the responsibility of forming an assembly to draft a permanent constitution for Libya which will then be put onto a referendum.

      1. Libya: check out UW economist Ali Abdussalam Tarhouni: he was born in 1951 and is a Libyan economists and politicians. He served as the Minister for oil and finance on the national transitional Council the provisional government authority and Libya from March 23 to November 22, 2011 he acted in the capacity of in terms Prime Minister of Libya during the departure of outgoing incumbent Jibril from October 23, 2011 in total El-Keib was formally named to succeed him on October 31.

    2. Will there be/were there elections? If so, when? Result? Elections to a general national Congress were held on July 7, 2012 and the NTC handed power to the newly elected assembly on August 8. The Congress had the responsibility of forming an assembly to draft a permanent constitution for Libya which will be then put to a referendum. From March to November 2011 UW economist Tarhouni acted in the capacity of an interim Prime Minister of Libya until El-Keib was formally named to succeed him on October 31.

    3. What some challenges does the country faces today? Use searches that include keywords like problems, issues and challenges. According to the New York Times article 2 years after revolt Libya faces a host of problems nearly 2 years after the revolt that killed Libyan leader Moammar time to get ready that he Qaddafi there is a weak government that is struggling to control its borders. Libya cannot stop the smuggling of weapons or manage regional militias that have refused to disarm. Libya has shut down its borders entirely with Tunisia and Egypt and border security continues to be an issue.

  4. Challenge Yourself (not due as part of the Country Report): What is happening in your country today (think how the government has attempted to impact S, P and E realities)? The two-year anniversary of the death of Muammar Gaddafi and the country is on a brink of another civil war. There is constant fighting in the city of Benghazi. Violence between radical militias and regular forces broke out as recently as October 16 and continues nonstop. Earlier this month the Prime Minister Zaidan was captured and kidnapped. The country is in complete turmoil